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set

set

Not to be confused with the {% set foo = "bar" ... %} expression in Jinja!

The set context method can be used to convert any iterable to a sequence of iterable elements that are unique (a set).

Args:

  • value: The iterable to convert (e.g. a list)
  • default: A default value to return if the value argument is not a valid iterable

Usage

{% set my_list = [1, 2, 2, 3] %}
{% set my_set = set(my_list) %}
{% do log(my_set) %} {# {1, 2, 3} #}
{% set my_invalid_iterable = 1234 %}
{% set my_set = set(my_invalid_iterable) %}
{% do log(my_set) %} {# None #}

set_strict

The set_strict context method can be used to convert any iterable to a sequence of iterable elements that are unique (a set). The difference to the set context method is that the set_strict method will raise an exception on a TypeError, if the provided value is not a valid iterable and cannot be converted to a set.

Args:

  • value: The iterable to convert (e.g. a list)
{% set my_list = [1, 2, 2, 3] %}
{% set my_set = set(my_list) %}
{% do log(my_set) %} {# {1, 2, 3} #}
{% set my_invalid_iterable = 1234 %}
{% set my_set = set_strict(my_invalid_iterable) %}
{% do log(my_set) %}

Compilation Error in ... (...)
'int' object is not iterable